The Tiffin Tin

What\’s in your lunchbox?

What Can You Say About Trix Yogurt?

with 6 comments

I come to you today to talk about Trix yogurt — yogurt so colorful it hurts your eyes early in the morning when you put it in the lunchbox, yogurt that’s in a small container with gaudy decorations, yogurt that’s more expensive than the kind you usually eat because it’s in single serve containers. Yogurt Tiniest Tiffin loves. Going, as he does, to a school where a lot of children pack Trix yogurt in their lunch boxes, he naturally feels that he too would like it.

I’m not crazy about Trix.  It’s expensive, and has lots & lots of sugar in it and it comes in colors and flavors that are sort of icky.  The clash between what you want your child to eat and what your child sees other children eating and therefore wants to eat gets more difficult to negotiate as children grow older. I’ve reacted to it by being flexible about an item or two in the lunchbox, not making a big fuss about it, and saying briefly what the pros and cons of Trix yogurt are. It’s a small thing, Trix yogurt, but it’s not without significance:

  • you can talk about packaging. That empty trix yogurt container is going to sit in a landfill for a very long time.
  • sugars — you might want to look at different yogurt containers and talk about how much sugar you’ll find in it, and how much you want it to have. We do this with fiber — the Tiffin kids are aware that cereals and breads with less than 2 grams of fiber a serving aren’t doing what grains are supposed to do for you.
  • the trix rabbit is sort of cute, sort of not. It’s fun to discuss what might really be going on when he says trix are for kids but not for silly rabbits. The idea of having something exclusive and not sharing it is what lunch is all about sometimes.
  • flexibility. Your child needs to know that everyone enjoys a treat, and that’s what something like this is. A treat.

So what’s in those two lunches up there in the picture today? Left over tri-tip sliced very thin and placed between whole wheat bread. A piece of banana bread, a lot of tangerine slices (it makes a huge difference to them that the tangerines are peeled ahead of time, a job they’re good at first thing in the morning — they don’t have that long for lunch and sometimes they’ll only get to eat a fruit if it’s peeled already) and, of course trix yogurt.

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Written by bloglily

December 12, 2006 at 8:11 am

6 Responses

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  1. You do a wonderful job of giving the kids treats, BL. I have diverted the kids to the Stoneybrook yogurt squeezes a few times. They are bright colors, supersweet, and have sassy pictures of skateboarders, etc, but also have live cultures. But I do regularly find the Trix yogurt in my shopping cart, if I take the kids to a standard grocery store. There’s an advantage of Farmer Joe’s– they don’t carry Trix, or their yogurt. The sweets at least have some thin skin of virtue around them. I have also heard a lot about what other kids get– there was one mom in pre-school who totally ignored the no candy rule, putting a single Hershey’s kiss in her daughter’s lunch, much to the consternation of the other, chocolateless children. Treats are wonderful, and sometimes not to be shared, but not to be flaunted, either, I think. Cheers!

    marymom

    December 13, 2006 at 9:44 am

  2. I am off trix for 2 reasons.. they taste too sweet for my little one and their flavor combinations are weird. I do understand the idea and I too have to give and send package yogurt so I try to look for the one with th eleast sugar.. stonyfield is good and so is dannon.

    shaheen

    December 13, 2006 at 12:52 pm

  3. Really silly question? What’s tri-tip?
    Dudelet went through a big phase of tiny pots of fromage frais. Currently (when mobile) he’ll make a bee-line for those tiny pots of bio-live yoghurt drink. Toddlers are just suckers for anything tiny and cute…

    (un)relaxeddad

    December 14, 2006 at 7:27 am

  4. Hello relaxed dad (I’ve decided you’re no longer un(relaxed) — I can tell!) Tri-tip! Can be great, can be awful — a cut of beef that’s thick & lovely when grilled well.

    Hello Shaheen — Yes, scary nuclear colors! We’ve gone through our package and have moved on. Sometimes, it’s good enough to say yes, and let a phase die a natural death.

    Flaunting is bad. It happens all the time too! The lunchbox wars deserve their own post, don’t you think??

    bloglily

    December 18, 2006 at 3:23 pm

  5. This is always the general problem. Kids want what other kids have. Here in Germany we too have many yogurt types like Trix. I have gotten over it with Soeren by explaining to him that they are so full of false colors, sugars etc. We actually bought a book about The Body for kids and one section explains how the food gets digested. This way it is easy to explain the “bad” stuff needs to be thrown out of the body. Soeren seems to understand this and is not crumbling under so called peer pressure.

    This was a good write up BlogLily!

    Meeta

    December 28, 2006 at 10:07 am

  6. So, I’m a late-comer to the discussion (clearly), but have so far gotten “around” the packaged foods battle with my twins (6, so the battle’s not over yet). One way that we’ve done this is to have them decorate their containers. We make our yogurt, and they painted their metal containers. The paint peels off, so periodically they can redecorate these containers. In the past we’ve used plastic containers and they’ve put stickers on them (I peel them off when I wash, they redecorate while we’re packing lunch…)

    So far, so good.

    Alli

    March 23, 2009 at 8:32 am


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